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Our Life With Trees

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Pindo Palms

I have never considered adding a pindo palm to my landscape because of the heavy clay that I live (and garden) in.    But Alvin's latest "freeze fix" has me reconsidering. One of Alvin's friends, who had suffered suffered freeze... Continue Reading →

Honey Mesquite Trees

Honey mesquite trees are fast growing and drought tolerant once established.

Texas Sabal

We have a wide variety of sizes of Texas Sabal Palm trees for sale.

Paloverde ‘Desert Museum’

 Desert museum Paloverde is our newest available product - it's a thornless paloverde!  We harvested the first trees yesterday and were thrilled with the root structure.  In nature, a paloverde tree may have three long roots with very few fibrous... Continue Reading →

Chapote or Texas Persimmons

Texas Persimmons, also known as Chapote, is a small semi-deciduous tree with dark  green leaves. It is often low forking or multi-trunked.   In South Texas, Texas Persimmons performs much like a live oak, retaining its leaves throughout the winter and then dropping... Continue Reading →

Wild Olive or Anacahuita

Sunday was the perfect day to spend outdoors - cool and sunny.  After burning the branches already in the fire pit, we wandered through the yard trimming dead wood to keep the fire going.   It gave us a chance to take... Continue Reading →

Texas Mountain Laurel

Native to Southwest and Central Texas, the blooms of the Texas Mountain Laurel are one of the first signs of spring.      The flowers are typically dark purple but occasionally a tree will bloom in pale lavender or white.   No matter... Continue Reading →

Honey Mesquite

A signature plant of south Texas, the mesquite tree’s popularity as a landscape tree is growing rapidly.    Its spreading canopy gives dappled shade and relief from our brutal summer sun.      The mesquites pictured above are growing along a... Continue Reading →

Texas Sabals – Centurions of the RGV

Stout, strong, majestic, a centurion along the roadways - that’s how I see our native Texas sabal palm.    This is the one palm native to the Rio Grande Valley.   Twenty years ago, the only large native stand could be found at the... Continue Reading →

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